How to stop shanks

What is it about the shank that makes golfers panic?

 

Three things:

 

  1. Firstly, it looks such an awful shot!

  2. Second, they don't know what causes it;

  3. lastly, where there's one shank there tends to be another

What causes a shank

Because the ball darts right, most golfers think an open club face causes the shank. But shanks usually come from an excessively closed face. The player swings out to in with the face closing hard -- both actions push the hosel closer to the ball (top). If the hosel catches the ball, it's shank, shank, shank.

Solution: 

Put a tee peg just outside and behind the ball (Approx 2x2 inches) to learn to swing down from the inside.

What do most golfers do to prevent the shank?

They try to close the face with the right hand through impact and swing on an even more left path. This only makes the path more out to in and the face more closed -- increasing the chances of another shank.

Try this drill ... Place a tee peg just outside the ball, and practice hitting wedges. If you're making a shank swing (out to in, face closed), you'll hit the tee peg. To miss it, you'll swing from the inside with the face more square to the target line. That's the main way to beat the shanks.

It is worth noting that Shanks can also happen from an excessive inside angle of attack with the face open or by being ahead of the ball with your body before impact.

Therefore my main suggestion would be to see a PGA professional and ask your swing to go on camera and then you can see for yourself the area you need to work on.

It is worth noting that Shanks can also happen from an excessive inside angle of attack with the face open or by being ahead of the ball with your body before impact.

Therefore my main suggestion would be to see a PGA professional and ask your swing to go on camera and then you can see for yourself the area you need to work on.

Picture 1: A shank
Picture 2: Club, ball & tee peg
Picture 3: Out to in swing
Picture 4: Correct path